Development spreads to Kalungwishi Farm Block

Development spreads to Kalungwishi Farm Block

Government has signed a 393-million-U.S. dollar agricultural infrastructure development project for the 200,000 hectares of Kalungwishi Farm Block in Mporokoso district

The deal signed with China Railway Seventh Group is for infrastructure development on a farming block.

The project’s construction period will run for three years, creating up to 35,000 jobs when the farming block starts operating.

Dora Siliya, Zambia’s Minister of Agriculture said the signing of the agreement marks a milestone in the government’s endeavor to construct infrastructure in farming blocks.

She said government was committed to the development of farming blocks as a pre-requisite to diversify the country’s economy.

“Agriculture is the way to go if we are to develop our economy and we are happy that the Chinese have come forward to help us develop infrastructure in these farming blocks,” Siliya said.

Meanwhile more than 20 farms invested by Chinese nationals or companies are now operating in Zambia, introducing the advanced technologies, rich experiences and bringing modern demonstration effects to the agriculture sector.

Previous Technical staff gets training on climate change adaptation
Next Union bemoans poor agriculture preparations

About author

You might also like

Africa 0 Comments

‘Agricultural production to increase’

The National Union for Small-scale Farmers of Zambia (NUSFAZ) says pronouncements by President Lungu that the country needs to work on agriculture as the mainstay will help increase productivity and

Weather forecasts project roll-out help women farmers

Authorities have applauded the real-time weather forecasts project roll-out across the country. The development is helping women farmers win the battle against the impact of climate change. The UNDP-supported Climate

Rivers of acid’ in Zambian villages

Dressed in colourful sarongs and t-shirts, the women of Hippo Pool village collect their water on the banks of the Kafue River on Zambia’s copper belt. As the sun sets