Artificial insemination to increase livestock population

Artificial insemination to increase livestock population

Livestock specialist says the ongoing countrywide Artificial Insemination (AI) programme will drastically improve Zambia’s cattle population

Speaking at a farmer information workshop held at Lusaka’s Czech Centre of Excellence, an integrated cattle farm, Renier Janse Van Vuuren, Managing Director of Agriserve Agro said AI pilots done in parts of Southern Province had increased conception rates by as much as 55% from low double digits.

“This will improve productivity and better returns for livestock farmers,” said Van Vuuren.

According to recent estimates by the veterinary department, the country’s livestock sector consists of 4 638 000 cattle, 4 800 000 goats, 500 000 sheep, 3 790 000 pigs and nearly 100 000 000 poultry.

The livestock population is mostly concentrated in Eastern, Western and Southern Provinces.

However, low productivity is a major constraint to the development of the livestock sector – it is not expanding at a rate sufficient to meet the growing demand.

Van Vuuren is optimistic AI will help increase conception of livestock across the country.

 

Source: Davies Mulenga

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