Agriculture windfall for African countries

Agriculture windfall for African countries

World Bank has announced plans to disburse, via the International
Development Association (IDA), $190 million to support agricultural
colleges in six African countries – Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana,
Kenya, Malawi and Mozambique.
As part of the project to Support Higher Agricultural Education in
Africa (Shaea), the project aims to strengthen relationship between
selected African universities and the regional agricultural sector, to
develop competent human capital needed to accelerate agribusiness
system transformation in the countries.
Early this month, the six states’ governments, the World Bank Group
and the Regional Universities Forum for Capacity Building in the
Agricultural Sector (Ruforum) launched a call for proposals to higher
education institutions.
The institutions selected will play the role of Regional Anchor
University (UAR) with the main mission to shut off skills and
knowledge loopholes in agriculture in sub-Saharan Africa.
The Shaea initiative complements the African Development Excellence
Centers (CEA-Impact) project, but focuses exclusively on higher
agricultural education and particularly on its relations with the
regional agricultural sector.

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